Episode 15: Scouting the Red Sox

Gus Quattlebaum ’93 dishes on his career as a pro scout and the upcoming baseball season.

Gus Quattlebaum ’93 is a baseball lifer. From his time at Andover playing in Phelps Park to setting hitting records at Davidson College to traveling across the Americas in search of the next big league star, Quattlebaum has made a career out of the game he loves. Now, as the Boston Red Sox’s Vice President of Professional Scouting, he manages a team of national scouts, compiles players reports that influence roster moves, and oversees the club’s minor league talent development.

Back in January Gus returned to Andover to participate in our Hot Stove night with fellow baseball insiders, and took some time to talk with Kevin Graber, Senior Associate Director of Admission and Varsity Baseball Coach. He even hints at the eventual signing of slugger J.D. Martinez. This one’s a must-listen for Red Sox die hards and anyone who follows baseball or is looking to break into the business of sports. Play ball!

Pictured above: Senior Associate Director of Admission Kevin Graber (left) with Gus Quattlebaum ’93. 

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Episode 13: NBC News Correspondent Stephanie Gosk ’90

NBC Correspondent Stephanie Gosk ’90 talks the #MeToo movement, USA Gymnastics, and journalistic integrity in the era of fake news.

A prominent figure in network television news, NBC correspondent Stephanie Gosk has reported on some of our nation’s and the world’s most important events. She’s tackled issues from the opioid crisis to terrorist attacks, natural disasters to prison escapes. She’s been embedded with troops and witnessed the best and worst of humanity while reporting on conflicts abroad.

A member of the Class of 1990, Gosk returned to campus recently to discuss her latest assignment: the rise of the #MeToo movement and cases of sexual misconduct that are plaguing industries from business and entertainment to sports and politics.

In this episode of Every Quarter, she talks with Tracy Sweet, Andover’s director of communication, about the scandal erupting around USA Gymnastics, journalistic integrity, and what it’s like to report from a war zone. Super Bowl fans will want to stick around for her decidedly biased view of the big game.

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Gosk (left) and Sweet recording Every Quarter in Graham Hall.

Episode 12: Global Peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution

John Marks ’61, P’95 discusses social entrepreneurship with Carmen Muñoz-Fernández and Eric Roland

As you scan the globe, what catches your attention the most? What are the highlights of a career dedicated to conflict resolution, peacebuilding, and social entrepreneurship? These are some of the questions that John Marks ’61, P’95, explored with the Phillips Academy community during a recent visit to campus.

Marks was, until 2014, president of Search for Common Ground, a peacebuilding NGO he founded in 1982 that now has 600 staff with offices in 36 countries. He also founded Common Ground Productions and is still a senior advisor to both organizations. He is a best-selling author, a former US Foreign Service member, a Skoll Awardee in Social Entrepreneurship, and an Ashoka Senior Fellow. The UN’s University of Peace awarded him an honorary PhD.

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Episode 10: True Grit with Angela Duckworth

Tang Institute Fellow Noah Rachlin talks with Angela Duckworth before her presentation at Phillips Academy.

Grit has been a pretty popular buzzword in education these past few years. The concept isn’t exactly new. Perseverance, willingness to learn, passion, positively dealing with adversity—these are all characteristics that we typically associate with good students, and people for that matter. While we may have anecdotally known this for a while, scientific research is now demonstrating that grit, along with a suite of characteristics known as character strengths, serve as essential tools that can help students develop the skills they need to flourish inside (and out) of the classroom.

Angela Duckworth is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also the founder and CEO of Character Lab, a nonprofit whose mission is to advance the science and practice of character development. Duckworth’s first book, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance, debuted May 3, 2016, as an immediate New York Times bestseller. Duckworth studies grit and self-control, two character strengths that are distinct from IQ and yet powerfully predict success and well-being.

She recently visited Phillips Academy to talk about her research and present to the community. Before hitting the stage Duckworth sat down with History & Social Science Instructor and Tang Institute Fellow Noah Rachlin to dive deeper into her thesis.

 

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Episode 08: Finding Your Voice with Jay Smooth

How do you teach and support student activism in 2017?

Fake news. Black Lives Matter. Women’s rights. These are just a few of the current issues Andover students are trying to grapple with. Phillips Academy is committed to equity and inclusion, youth from every quarter, non sibi. But how do you uphold these values when it feels like the world beyond our campus bubble is turning into the direct antithesis of everything we try to instill in our community? There are no easy answers. Conversations, however, are happening. Students want to be involved. They have a voice. And we need to listen.

Back in April Andover hosted Stand Up: Student Activism in Independent Schools, a daylong symposium for independent school educators and administrators. One of our presenters was the writer, video blogger, and cultural commentator Jay Smooth. Jay grew up in the burgeoning New York hip-hop scene and is the founder of the city’s longest-running hip hop radio program, WBAI’s Underground Railroad. Before his presentation, Jay joined Dean of Community and Multicultural Development LaShawn Springer to discuss his path from DJ to pundit, the current state of hip-hop and how today’s students can be supported in their efforts to lead positive change through activism.

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Episode 05: The Road to Repatriation

Peabody Museum Director Ryan Wheeler discusses repatriation and sacred artifacts with members of White Earth Nation.

Since the beginning of time, human beings have documented their experiences for future generations—on caves, tablets, scrolls and parchment. Now imagine a world where these records were lost. What if the Magna Carta were placed in a drawer, never to be seen again?

In this episode of EQ, we meet Anishinaabeg members of White Earth Nation. Their search for one of their nation’s founding documents led them to Andover, where a large birch scroll containing ancient accounts from their ancestors languished undiscovered for more than a century.

Phillips Academy’s Robert S. Peabody Museum is home to one of the nation’s major repositories of Native American archaeological collections. Founded in 1901, its first curator was the legendary Warren King Moorehead, known as “the dean of American archaeology.” So how did Moorehead come into possession of this sacred scroll and many other artifacts? And what does this discovery mean to its people and their future?

Join archaeologist and Peabody Museum director Ryan Wheeler and three members of White Earth Nation, who recently met at the museum to tell the story behind the lost scroll, recount its incredible journey and describe ongoing repatriation collaboration.

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Episode 04: Internment – America’s Dark Chapter

Sam Mihara describes life inside a Japanese internment camp with Andover’s Damany Fisher.

In early 1942, two months after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered all Japanese-Americans to evacuate the West Coast. Nine-year-old Sam Mihara and his family were among the approximately 120,000 people who were sent to internment camps across the country. The Miharas, who lived in San Francisco, landed at Heart Mountain, a camp in northern Wyoming, where they would live for the next three years.

Sam Mihara visited Phillips Academy in October 2016 to share his story of what life was like inside the camp and how he was affected by those years of confinement, intolerance, and discrimination. Andover Instructor and historian Damany Fisher talked with Mihara and his wife Helene about their experiences for Every Quarter. Fisher is an authority on the American history of residential segregation and housing discrimination. His paper, “No Utopia: the African American Struggle for Fair Housing in Postwar Sacramento, 1948-1967,” was recently published in the academic journal Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

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