Episode 16: Affecting Visual Effects

David Simons ’86 talks computing at Andover, start-ups, and collaborating with The Simpsons.

Adobe After Effects is a staple in the visual effects post-production world. It is used in large-scale Hollywood productions, network television, and even by the Office of Communication here at Andover. The software’s co-founder, David Simons, is a member of Andover’s class of 1986.

On this episode of Every Quarter, Simons sits down with Neil Evans to discuss his career path to Adobe, the struggles of having one of the first personal computers at Andover, and his advice for aspiring coders.

Simons’ new project, Character Animator, combines elements of After Effects with live action puppetry technology and has been featured recently on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert [embedded below] and a live episode of The Simpsons.

 

Episode 15: Scouting the Red Sox

Gus Quattlebaum ’93 dishes on his career as a pro scout and the upcoming baseball season.

Gus Quattlebaum ’93 is a baseball lifer. From his time at Andover playing in Phelps Park to setting hitting records at Davidson College to traveling across the Americas in search of the next big league star, Quattlebaum has made a career out of the game he loves. Now, as the Boston Red Sox’s Vice President of Professional Scouting, he manages a team of national scouts, compiles players reports that influence roster moves, and oversees the club’s minor league talent development.

Back in January Gus returned to Andover to participate in our Hot Stove night with fellow baseball insiders, and took some time to talk with Kevin Graber, Senior Associate Director of Admission and Varsity Baseball Coach. He even hints at the eventual signing of slugger J.D. Martinez. This one’s a must-listen for Red Sox die hards and anyone who follows baseball or is looking to break into the business of sports. Play ball!

Pictured above: Senior Associate Director of Admission Kevin Graber (left) with Gus Quattlebaum ’93. 

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Episode 13: NBC News Correspondent Stephanie Gosk ’90

NBC Correspondent Stephanie Gosk ’90 talks the #MeToo movement, USA Gymnastics, and journalistic integrity in the era of fake news.

A prominent figure in network television news, NBC correspondent Stephanie Gosk has reported on some of our nation’s and the world’s most important events. She’s tackled issues from the opioid crisis to terrorist attacks, natural disasters to prison escapes. She’s been embedded with troops and witnessed the best and worst of humanity while reporting on conflicts abroad.

A member of the Class of 1990, Gosk returned to campus recently to discuss her latest assignment: the rise of the #MeToo movement and cases of sexual misconduct that are plaguing industries from business and entertainment to sports and politics.

In this episode of Every Quarter, she talks with Tracy Sweet, Andover’s director of communication, about the scandal erupting around USA Gymnastics, journalistic integrity, and what it’s like to report from a war zone. Super Bowl fans will want to stick around for her decidedly biased view of the big game.

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Gosk (left) and Sweet recording Every Quarter in Graham Hall.

Episode 12: Global Peacebuilding and Conflict Resolution

John Marks ’61, P’95 discusses social entrepreneurship with Carmen Muñoz-Fernández and Eric Roland

As you scan the globe, what catches your attention the most? What are the highlights of a career dedicated to conflict resolution, peacebuilding, and social entrepreneurship? These are some of the questions that John Marks ’61, P’95, explored with the Phillips Academy community during a recent visit to campus.

Marks was, until 2014, president of Search for Common Ground, a peacebuilding NGO he founded in 1982 that now has 600 staff with offices in 36 countries. He also founded Common Ground Productions and is still a senior advisor to both organizations. He is a best-selling author, a former US Foreign Service member, a Skoll Awardee in Social Entrepreneurship, and an Ashoka Senior Fellow. The UN’s University of Peace awarded him an honorary PhD.

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Episode 11: The EQ Lounge at Reunion Weekend

Alumni share memories and stories from their time at Andover and Abbot.

Reunion Weekend is a special time for our alums. Everyone is back on campus, savoring the nostalgia, seeing old friends, and reconnecting with the school that shaped their formative years. We wanted to capture this feeling so for Reunion 2017 we tried an experiment. We set up a tent, a table, and chairs in front of George Washington Hall and invited alumni in to sit, relax, and reflect. We called it the EQ Lounge, and these are their stories.

Episode 09: A Conversation on Coeducation

Louise Kennedy ’76 and Nancy Sizer reminisce about coeducation and Andover’s evolution in the seventies.

Earlier this year Every Quarter had the privilege of hosting a special conversation between Nancy Sizer and Louise Kennedy, Class of 1976. Sizer taught at Andover in the seventies and eighties and was the spouse of the renowned educational reformer and Phillips Academy’s 12th Head of School, Ted Sizer. Kennedy came to Andover in the first year of coeducation and went on to serve as the first female editor of The Phillipian, the Academy’s student-run newspaper.

This episode is like listening in on old friends reuniting after many years apart. They discuss the merger of Phillips and Abbot Academies, what life was like on campus in the early seventies and how students and faculty adapted to the transition. Their wide-ranging and fascinating talk is filled with personal stories, random tangents, and perspective that can only be gained from looking back on their experiences some forty years later.

Episode 07: The Business of Being Funny

Filmmaker Bobby Farrelly ’77 talks comedy, hit films and returning to Andover for the first time in 40 years.

What makes you laugh? Is it the observational stand-up of Louis C.K.? Sketches on Saturday Night Live? Mark Maron’s podcast that you always listen to first before EQ? You see, comedy is subjective. What makes one person laugh probably won’t make another person laugh, and humor is rarely an acquired taste. It’s not like you turn thirty and suddenly like Seinfeld. Well, maybe that’s a bad example. The point is, you either get the joke or you don’t.

In the early nineties, The Farrelly Brothers struck gold with a string of blockbusters that seemed to make everyone laugh. Dumb and Dumber. There’s Something About Mary. Kingpin. Outside Providence. Shallow Hal. Fever Pitch. You couldn’t escape their slapstick premises and earnest storytelling that made them the two of the most successful writers and directors in Hollywood. They’ve worked with comic icons like Bill Murray, Jim Carrey, Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Alec Baldwin and Jimmy Fallon, but as Bobby Farrelly, Class of 1977 recently recounted at a Phillips Academy All-School Meeting, the brothers had no real movie-making aspirations growing up, and sort of fell into the trade after a few failed ventures in Los Angeles.

Upon his first visit back to Andover in forty years, Bobby sat down with Neil Evans to talk the current state of comedy, how to be funny in today’s politically correct climate and what he learned from being kicked out of Andover.

Farrelly