Episode 07: The Business of Being Funny

Filmmaker Bobby Farrelly ’77 talks comedy, hit films and returning to Andover for the first time in 40 years.

What makes you laugh? Is it the observational stand-up of Louis C.K.? Sketches on Saturday Night Live? Mark Maron’s podcast that you always listen to first before EQ? You see, comedy is subjective. What makes one person laugh probably won’t make another person laugh, and humor is rarely an acquired taste. It’s not like you turn thirty and suddenly like Seinfeld. Well, maybe that’s a bad example. The point is, you either get the joke or you don’t.

In the early nineties, The Farrelly Brothers struck gold with a string of blockbusters that seemed to make everyone laugh. Dumb and Dumber. There’s Something About Mary. Kingpin. Outside Providence. Shallow Hal. Fever Pitch. You couldn’t escape their slapstick premises and earnest storytelling that made them the two of the most successful writers and directors in Hollywood. They’ve worked with comic icons like Bill Murray, Jim Carrey, Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Alec Baldwin and Jimmy Fallon, but as Bobby Farrelly, Class of 1977 recently recounted at a Phillips Academy All-School Meeting, the brothers had no real movie-making aspirations growing up, and sort of fell into the trade after a few failed ventures in Los Angeles.

Upon his first visit back to Andover in forty years, Bobby sat down with Neil Evans to talk the current state of comedy, how to be funny in today’s politically correct climate and what he learned from being kicked out of Andover.

Farrelly

Episode 06: Frank Stella ’54

The legendary artist looks back on where it all started.

Frank Stella ’54 is the renowned artist he is today because of Phillips Academy. The access. The curriculum. The friendships (with fellow artists Carl Andre ’53 and Hollis Frampton ’54). Andover shaped the artist Stella would become. In this special episode of Every Quarter, hear the candid tales from his early years, stories of the New York art scene in the sixties and why he keeps coming back to where it all started.

Throughout his prolific and influential career, Stella has been a major figure in the art world, internationally hailed as one of America’s most significant artists. In his paintings, metal reliefs, sculptures, and prints, he has explored abstraction, which emerged during the early twentieth century in the innovations of artists such as Vassily Kandinsky, Kazimir Malevich, Piet Mondrian, and Pablo Picasso. A pioneer of minimalism in the 1960s, Stella continues to experiment and innovate, creating some of the most daring work to be seen today.

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Episode 05: The Road to Repatriation

Peabody Museum Director Ryan Wheeler discusses repatriation and sacred artifacts with members of White Earth Nation.

Since the beginning of time, human beings have documented their experiences for future generations—on caves, tablets, scrolls and parchment. Now imagine a world where these records were lost. What if the Magna Carta were placed in a drawer, never to be seen again?

In this episode of EQ, we meet Anishinaabeg members of White Earth Nation. Their search for one of their nation’s founding documents led them to Andover, where a large birch scroll containing ancient accounts from their ancestors languished undiscovered for more than a century.

Phillips Academy’s Robert S. Peabody Museum is home to one of the nation’s major repositories of Native American archaeological collections. Founded in 1901, its first curator was the legendary Warren King Moorehead, known as “the dean of American archaeology.” So how did Moorehead come into possession of this sacred scroll and many other artifacts? And what does this discovery mean to its people and their future?

Join archaeologist and Peabody Museum director Ryan Wheeler and three members of White Earth Nation, who recently met at the museum to tell the story behind the lost scroll, recount its incredible journey and describe ongoing repatriation collaboration.

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Episode 04: Internment – America’s Dark Chapter

Sam Mihara describes life inside a Japanese internment camp with Andover’s Damany Fisher.

In early 1942, two months after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered all Japanese-Americans to evacuate the West Coast. Nine-year-old Sam Mihara and his family were among the approximately 120,000 people who were sent to internment camps across the country. The Miharas, who lived in San Francisco, landed at Heart Mountain, a camp in northern Wyoming, where they would live for the next three years.

Sam Mihara visited Phillips Academy in October 2016 to share his story of what life was like inside the camp and how he was affected by those years of confinement, intolerance, and discrimination. Andover Instructor and historian Damany Fisher talked with Mihara and his wife Helene about their experiences for Every Quarter. Fisher is an authority on the American history of residential segregation and housing discrimination. His paper, “No Utopia: the African American Struggle for Fair Housing in Postwar Sacramento, 1948-1967,” was recently published in the academic journal Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

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Episode 03: 10 Years of Need-Blind Admission

Dean of Admission and Financial Aid Jim Ventre ’79 discusses Phillips Academy’s game-changing financial aid initiative.

The need-blind admission initiative is the single most distinct feature for which Phillips Academy is recognized around the globe. This episode dives into Andover’s progressive financial aid policies and the history of need-blind admission. On the eve of celebrating a decade of its existence, Neil Evans from the Office of Communication sits down with Jim Ventre ’79, dean of admission and financial aid, to discuss the game-changing initiative, what “Big Blue Nice” means, and why socioeconomic status plays no part in how students are admitted to Andover.

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Episode 02: Born Digital

Head of School John Palfrey and Harvard Researcher Urs Gasser moderate a conversation on the lives of tech-savvy teenagers.

What does it mean to be born digital? How are adults and children navigating the ever-evolving and complex technological landscape of modern life? Are students spending too much time on devices or are they using modern innovations to develop crucial life skills? Phillips Academy Head of School John Palfrey and Harvard Researcher Urs Gasser have spent years researching these topics and you might be surprised at what they’ve discovered.

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Episode 01: From Andover to F/A-18s

Lieutenant Commander Laurie Coffey ’95 and Commander Becky Dowling Calder ’94 sit down for a conversation on basketball, the Navy, flying F/A-18s and choosing lives of service.

Non sibi—not for self: The motto is inscribed on Andover’s seal, the Naval Academy’s chapel and in the minds of two women who were classmates at both. Commander Becky Dowling Calder ’94 and Lieutenant Commander Laurie Coffey ’95, two of Phillips Academy’s legendary athletes, could have played college basketball anywhere they wanted. They each chose Annapolis and went on to fly F/A-18 Hornets at the highest level, selflessly serving and protecting our country for the past 20 years. Why? How did Andover prepare them for the rigors of military life and contribute to their successes?

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